C e r a m i c s


Bizen Sake Flask and Cup by FUJIWARA YÛ (*1932-2001)

Inv. Nr. #17.021
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 12,3 x D 9,3 and H 4,6 x D 6,2 cm

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

This set of a Bizen sake flask and cup was made by legendary Fujiwara Yû who was born 1932 in Honami in Bizen, Okayama prefecture. As son of famous Fujiwara Kei (1899-1983) he has also been awarded the title "Living National Treasure" in 1996 for his continous efforts to preserve and teach the traditional techniques of Bizen pottery. Fujiwara Yû was early recognized abroad as one of Japan's leading traditional potters what led to countless exhibitons in Japan and overseas. His works are collected in many international public collections and are part of the permanent exhibition in the Fujiwara Kei Memorial Hall, a wonderful museum dedicated to the familiy's work and the Bizen tradition in Okayama.



Fresh Water Jar (Mizusashi) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #17.015
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 19,2  x D 20,1 cm

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

This cylindrical fresh water jar (tsutsu-mizusashi) is made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. The sand-colored clay - still to be seen at six firing support marks at the bottom - changed into bright red orange during firing process. Thick green grey ash glaze is laying on the front and turns more into yellow sprinkles to the top.  The inside has a fantastic ashglaze that runs in strips to the bottom of the jar. Beautiful masterpiece in excellent condition.

 

Takahashi Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Tea Caddy (Chaire) by

TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #17.011
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 7,9  x D 8,0 cm

S O L D

This fine tea caddy (chaire) was made by Takahashi Rakusai IV.  The rectangular shaped object is all-over covered with crystallized brown and green ash glaze. On two spots, in one of the notch and at the foot of the caddy, ash has melted to single emerald green glaze drops, a phenomena that is called "dragonfly eye" (tonbo no me 蜻蛉の目) in Japanese. Just the unglazed base shows the typical sand-colored body which partly turned to orange-red due to oxidation during the firing process. An excellent piece in perfect condition.

 

Takahashi Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Bizen Flower Vase (Hanaire) by KIMURA SOJÔ (*1945)

Inv. Nr. #17.009
Date End 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 24,5  x D 16,5 cm

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

An outstanding, museum quality Bizen flower vase made by Kimura Sojô, who was born into one of the six famous Bizen potter families and trained by the famous Living National Treasure Isezaki Jun (*1936). This extraordinary piece bears exceptional patterns of highly developed techniques uniqe to Bizen pottery. Long ash glaze drops that run vertically around the vase are showing that the object has layed down on the side in the kiln during firing. Circular shaped reverse patterns (botamochi) with beautiful and lively color changing of garnet red, orange and green (yôhen) are the visible traces of the firing supports. All these are typical characteristics of the so called "pushed-over" pieces (korogashi) that are rare and regarded as the master pieces of  highly advanced potters.



Iga Tea Caddy "Green Mountain" by

IMAI KÔJIN (*1937)

Inv. Nr. #17.013
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 10,1  x D 6,3 cm

S O L D

This extraordinary tea caddy (chaire) was made by Imai Kôjin who was born 1937 and has studied pottery between 1957-61 under Kawai Zuihô (1913-64) in Kyoto. His works were shown on many important exhibitions in Japan such as Art Exhibition Kyoto, Shiga Prefectural Exhibition, Nitten (Japanese National Exhibition) as well as exhibitons abroad under patronage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In 1973 Kôjin moved to Iga and devoted himself to explore and study Old-Iga ware, which gained with its carefree irregular style popularity for the production of tea ceremony utensils in medieval Japan. Much of his efforts and knowledge culminated into this excellent piece. On the dark clay, which turned brown through oxidation during firing, large areas are covered by a bluish green ash glazing on which single glaze drops are running downwards.

The current 12th head of the Matsuo-ryû tea ceremony branch, Myôgensai Sôten (or Matsuo Sôten, *1962), who is a Zen-priest at Daitoku-ji, Kyoto, has named this Chaire "Green Mountain" (Aoyama/Seizan青山) and inscribed it in the inside of its wooden box. In tea ceremony circles only the most valued items get their own name.

Despite the fact that this Chaire really reminds one on a moutain, covered by lush greens, from which streams of blue rivers or waterfalls running downwards, the words "Green Mountain" are bearing a strong Zen Buddhist connotation. An aphorism recorded in the Jingde chuandeng lu from around 1004 that was probably made by Zen master Mazu Daoyi (709-788), wants to give an idea of our own inherent Buddha nature. He explains: It is like a "Green mountain, that is originally unmoved. White clouds are coming and going by themselves".



Fresh Water Jar (Mizusashi) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #17.012
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 19,2  x D 20,1 cm

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

This spacious, fantastic fresh water jar with handles (mimi-tsuki mizusashi) is made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. He was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Tea Bowl (Chawan) by

KANESHIGE KÔSUKE (*1943)

Inv. Nr. #17.008
Date early 21th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 8,9 x D 12,4 cm

Comes with signed box and black lacquered storage box

This masterfully crafted Bizen tea bowl was made by Kaneshige Kôsuke 金重晃介 (*1943) who is the third son of legendary Bizen master Kaneshige Tôyô 金重陶陽 (1896-1967). However, as this example shows Kôsuke became a master of its own. The harmoniously hand-formed tea bowl has a perfect ash glaze of a triangular shaped yelow and black crust that is culminating in a single glaze drop on the lower rim of the bowl. Kôsuke's works have been awared many times and were acquired by important public collections such as the Santory Museum of Art, the Niimi Museum of Art, the Ibara Municipal Denchû Art Museum and the Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art.

This high-class item has a signed wooden box and an extra black-lacquered pawlonia wood box for additional protection. 



Flower Vase (Hanatsubo) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A53
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 22,5  x D 18,5 cm

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Takahashi Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Flower Vase (Hanaire) by

TSUJIMURA SHIRÔ (*1947)

Inv. Nr. #A44
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 26  x D 10 cm

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Flower vase made of sandy clay with natural ash glaze (shizenyû 自然釉), partly melted to clear, emerald green "dragonfly eyes" (tonbo no me 蜻蛉の目). Original wooden box with artist's inscription: Natural Ash Glaze Flower Vase; signature and seal: Shirô. Tsujimura Shirō, born 1947 in Gosei, Nara prefecture, is one of the most innovative and all-round talents in Japanese pottery scene. Since the late 70’s his works are exhibited in countless solo- and group shows and became part of numerous international collections.



Shigaraki Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A01
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Fine Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) with excellent ishihaze ("stone explosions") made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Shigaraki Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A10
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Fine Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) with high wall and green excellent melted in the traces of the finger made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Flat Tea Bowl (hira-chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A19
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

High-class flat Shigaraki tea bowl (hira-chawan) for summer with excellent ash glazing and strong ishihaze ("stone explosions") made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Shigaraki Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A29
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

A masterfully thrown Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) with nice irregular shape, strong ishihaze ("stone explosions") made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Shigaraki Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A30
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Excellent Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) with uncommon grey ash glaze made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Shigaraki Irabo-style Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A34
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Very rare Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) with unusual green glaze in style of korean irabo-ware made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Shigaraki Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A46
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Beautiful Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) made by Takahashi Rakusai IV with a more glossy ash glaze between the typical rusty green parts. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Shigaraki Tea Bowl (chawan) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A57
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions  

Comes with signed and sealed wooden box.

Excellent, bright orange Shigaraki tea bowl (chawan) with a "dragonfly eye" (tonbo no me 蜻蛉の目) - a green glaze drop at the front - made by Takahashi Rakusai IV. Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



High-class Tea Caddy (Chaire) by TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A54
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 7,0  x D 7,2 cm

S O L D 

Takahashi Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Tea Caddy (Chaire) by

UEDA NAOKATA IV (*1898-1975)

Inv. Nr. #17.007
Date Mid 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 6,6 x D 5,9 cm

S O L D

A perfect little tea caddy made by Shigaraki master Ueda Naokata IV 上田直方 四代 (1898-1975) who was first designated 'Intangible Cultural Property' of Shiga prefecture. The Ueda family is along with the Takahashi family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving the old technics, especially after the second world war. The familiy has a long tradition as potters starting their business with Ueda Naokata I, who lived 1805-1891. Ueda Naokata IV succeded his father the third Ueda in 1931.



Tea Caddy (Chaire) by

TAKAHASHI RAKUSAI IV (*1925)

Inv. Nr. #A55
Date 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 8,2 x D 7,6 cm

S O L D

Takahashi Rakusai IV was born 1925 in Shigaraki and is probably the most famous Shigaraki potter. The Takahashi family is along with the Ueda family the oldest potter family in Shigaraki and largely responsible for preserving traditions, especially after the second world war. Takahashi Rakusai IV succeeded his father the third Takahashi – who was designated as „Intangible Cultural Property“ by government – in 1976 and passed the tradition subsequently to his son in 2010.



Rare Tea Caddy (Chaire) by

MASAMUNE MORIYASU (SATORU) (1945-2006)

Inv. Nr. #A21
Date End 20th c.
Material Ash glazed stoneware
Dimensions H 8,3  x D 6,7 cm

S O L D

The potter Masamune Moriyasu (former Satoru or Kengo) 正宗杜康 (悟) (1954-2006) was one of the genius Bizen talents who passed away far too young in 2006 in age 52. However, he was awarded with many prices from the very beginning of his own kiln in 1975. His works – always high in quality and design, are much sought after and scarcely met on the public market. Here we offer the rare opportunity to purchase one.